WWT London Wetland Centre
Queen Elizabeth’s Walk, Barnes, London, Greater London, SW13 9WT, England, UK.

Mandarin Duck

Aix galericulata

Family: Anatidae (Swans, ducks and geese)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs and ponds.

Size: Length 41-49 cm (16-19 in). Wingspan 65-75 cm (26-30 in).

Food: Insects, vegetation and seeds.

Voice: Low pitched roo-roo-roo.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A perching duck originating from East Asia.

Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) © photo by Adrian Pingstone

Great Crested Grebe

Podiceps cristatus

Family: Podicipedidae (Grebes)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs and ponds.

Size: Length 46-51 cm (18-20 in). Wingspan 59-73 cm (23-29 in).

Voice: Vrek-vrek-vrek. At night koorrr.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

It has an elaborate mating display that climaxes with a penguin dance. It was hunted almost to extinction in the 19th century. The RSPB was set up to help protect this species.

Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus) © JJ Harrison cc

Sand Martin

Riparia riparia

Family: Hirundinidae (Swallows and martins)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams and estuaries.

Size: Length 12 cm (4.7 in).

Food: Insects in flight.

Voice: Rapid trill and alarm of chirrup.

Season: Early March to late October. March till October.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

The smallest of the swallows and martins, its high agility enables it to catch insects in flight.

Sand Martin (Riparia riparia) © Nigel Wedge cc

Yellow Wagtail

Motacilla flava

Family: Motacillidae (Pipits and wagtails)

Habitat: Farmland, grasslands and marsh.

Size: Length 15-16 cm (5.9-6.3 in).

Food: Small insects such as flies and beetles.

Voice: Tseep.

Season: Late March to late September. Visitor.

Part of a flock, it has a distinctive wagging or flicking tail as it walks about on the ground. It catches insects in flight.

Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava) © Andreas Trepte cc

Redshank

Tringa totanus

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Saltmarshes, flood meadows, near lakes, estuaries and coastal lagoons.

Food: Insects, earthworms, molluscs and crustaceans.

Voice: Too-too-too and chu-chu-chu.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Typically wades in large flocks.

Redshank (Tringa totanus) © pjt56 cc

Teal

Anas crecca

Family: Anatidae (Swans, ducks and geese)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds, wetlands and freshwaters, coastal grazing marsh, estuaries and reedbeds.

Size: Length 20-30 cm (7.9-11.8 in). Wingspan 53-59 cm (21-23 in).

Food: Seeds and small invertebrates.

Voice: ♂ keek as a high-pitched ringing clear whistle. ♀ croak.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A dabbling duck.

Eurasian Teal (Anas crecca) © photo by Tim Bowman

Lapwing

Vanellus vanellus

Family: Charadriidae (Plovers and lapwings)

Habitat: Grasslands, marsh, estuaries and purple moor grass and rush pasture.

Food: Worms and insects.

Voice: Distinctive pee-wit.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Also known as the Peewit, Green Plover or just Lapwing in the UK this bird has a red status due to rapidly declining numbers. It has a distinctive wavering flight.

Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Oystercatcher

Haematopus ostralegus

Family: Haematopodidae

Habitat: Coastal, lakes and reservoirs, meadows, rivers and streams, wetlands and freshwaters and estuaries.

Size: Length 40-45 cm (16-18 in). Wingspan 80-85 cm (31-33 in).

Food: Mussels, cockles and worms.

Voice: High pitched kleep.

Season: All year round.

A wading bird that eats muscles and cockles on the coast and mainly worms inland.

Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) © Bjørn Christian Tørrissen cc

Wheatear

Oenanthe oenanthe

Family: Muscicapidae (Old World flycatchers)

Habitat: Grasslands, heathlands and beaches and shorelines.

Food: Insects and larvae.

Voice: Call: chack. Song: crackly whistle.

Season: Early March to late October.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) ♀ © Martin Cooper cc

Hobby

Falco subbuteo

Family: Falconidae (Falcons and allies)

Habitat: Savanna, farmland, heathlands, marsh and wetlands and freshwaters.

Size: Length 29-36 cm (11-14 in). Wingspan 74-84 cm (29-33 in). Weight. 175-285 g (6.2-10.1 oz)

Food: Insects, small birds and bats.

Season: Early April to late October.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Hobbies nest in old nests of crows and other birds.

Hobby (Falco subbuteo) © Ron Knight cc

Peregrine

Falco peregrinus

Family: Falconidae (Falcons and allies)

Habitat: Marsh, sea cliffs and purple moor grass and rush pasture.

Size: Length 34-58 cm (13-23 in). Wingspan 74-120 cm (29-47 in).

Food: Small and medium sized birds.

Voice: Harsh reck-reck-reck.

Season: All year round.

Hunts at dawn and dusk, swooping down on birds in flight at great speed usually knocking them out with the impact.

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) © Mike Baird cc

Wigeon

Anas penelope

Family: Anatidae (Swans, ducks and geese)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, marsh, wetlands and freshwaters and estuaries.

Food: Aquatic plants, grasses, roots.

Voice: ♂ pjiew pjiew. ♀ growling rawr.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A dabbling duck that nests on the ground, near water and under cover.

Wigeon (Anas penelope) ♂ © PD

Chiffchaff

Phylloscopus collybita

Family: Phylloscopidae (Leaf and wing warblers)

Habitat: Gardens and parks, woodland and hedgerows.

Food: Insects from trees and flight.

Voice: Sharp series of chiff chaff sounds. Hoo-eet call.

Season: All year round. Migrants late March to September.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Olive green warbler that gets its name from its distinctive chiff chaff song. The female builds a domed nest on or near the ground.

Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita) © photo by SOC

Buzzard

Buteo buteo

Family: Accipitridae (Hawks and eagles)

Habitat: Coastal, farmland, grassland, heathland and woodland.

Size: Length 40-58 cm (16-23 in). Wingspan 109-136 cm (43-54 in).

Food: Small mammals, birds, carrion, earthworms and large insects.

Voice: Cat like mewing.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Takes off with distinctive slow wing beats, often circling or hovering. Frequently uses fence posts or similar as look-outs.

Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) © Aviceda cc

Snipe

Gallinago gallinago

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Moorland, marshes, bogs, tundra, wet meadows and pools.

Food: Small invertebrates - worms, insect larvae - and some plants.

Voice: Tick-er repeated. Also harsh scarp when alarmed.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

During courtship the male flies high in circles and then makes shallow dives producing a drumming sound by vibrating its tail feathers. Amber Listed in the UK due to steep declines in lowland wet grassland.

Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) ♂ © photo by Tim Bowman

Common Sandpiper

Actitis hypoleucos

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, beaches and shorelines, estuaries and lochs.

Size: Length 18-20 cm (7.1-7.9 in). Wingspan 32-35 cm (13-14 in).

Food: Insects, crustaceans and other invertebrates.

Season: All year round. All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Forages on the ground or in shallow water and nests on the ground near freshwater.

Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) © Koshy Koshy cc

Yellow Wagtail

Motacilla flava

Family: Motacillidae (Pipits and wagtails)

Habitat: Farmland, grasslands and marsh.

Size: Length 15-16 cm (5.9-6.3 in).

Food: Small insects such as flies and beetles.

Voice: Tseep.

Season: Late March to late September. Visitor.

Part of a flock, it has a distinctive wagging or flicking tail as it walks about on the ground. It catches insects in flight.

Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava) © Andreas Trepte cc

Dunlin

Calidris alpina

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Estuaries and shoreline.

Size: Length 17-21 cm (6.7-8.3 in). Wingspan 32-36 cm (13-14 in).

Food: Insects, snails and worms.

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Highly gregarious in winter, forming large flocks on coastal mudflats or sandy beaches.

Dunlin (Calidris alpina) © Kev Chapman cc

Green Sandpiper

Tringa ochropus

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, marsh and rivers and streams.

Food: Insects.

Season: Early July to late March.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

A small wader that along with the solitary sandpiper is the only scolopacid to nest in trees.

Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) © Ferran Pestaña cc

Black-tailed Godwit

Limosa limosa

Family: Scolopacidae (Sandpipers and allies)

Habitat: Marsh, meadows and estuaries.

Size: Length 42 cm (17 in). Wingspan of 70-82 cm (28-32 in). Bill length (7.5-12 cm (3.0-4.7 in).

Food: Insects, worms, snails and plants.

Season: Early August to late December.

IUCN Conservation Status: Near Threatened


Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) © Keith Gallie cc

Common Lizard

Zootoca vivipara

Family: Lacertidae

Habitat: Coastal, heathland, grassland, woodland, gardens and parks, uplands, upland calcareous grassland and upland heathland.

Size: Length 12 cm (4.7 in).

Season: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Often seen basking in the sun.

Gives birth to live young.

Common Lizard (Zootoca vivipara) © orangeaurochs cc

Meadow Brown

Maniola jurtina

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Grasslands, meadows, woodland, arable field margins and hedgerows.

Size: Length 25 mm (1 in).

Food: Grasses (larva). Thistles, Blackberries, Daisies, Cow Parsip, etc (adult).

Flight: Early May to late September.

Males are less colourful and more active and range furtherthan the females. Winter passed as a small bright green caterpillar.

Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina) ♀ © David Short cc

Gatekeeper

Pyronia tithonus

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Arable field margins, hedgerows, scrub and woodland clearings and edges.

Size: Length 19 mm (0.7 In).

Food: Grasses.

Flight: Early July to late September.

Also known as the hedge brown, it is often found near country gates and styles, hence the name.

Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonus) ♂ © Duncan cc

Small White

Pieris rapae

Family: Pieridae (Yellows-and-Whites)

Habitat: Open areas and flowery places.

Food: Cultivated and wild brassicas.

Flight: Early March to late October.

Also called the small cabbage white as its green larvae feed on cabbages.

Small White (Pieris rapae) ♂ © photo by Chaos911

Green-veined White

Pieris napi

Family: Pieridae (Yellows-and-Whites)

Habitat: Flowery meadows, gardens and hedgerows. Damp grassy areas.

Size: Length 25 mm (1 in).

Food: Wild brassicas such as watercress.

Flight: Early March to late October.

The underside hind wings have veins with a greenish tint, hence the name green-veined white.

Green-veined White (Pieris napi) © photo by Dave Dunford

Small Skipper

Thymelicus sylvestris

Family: Hesperiidae (skipper)

Habitat: Grasslands, field edges and woodland glades.

Size: Length 14 mm. Wingspan 25-30 mm.

Food: Yorkshire fog almost exclusively but sometimes Timothy, Creeping Soft-grass, False Brome, Meadow Foxtail, and Cocks-foot.

Flight: Early June to late August.

The undersides of the tips of the antennae are yellow orange, distinguishing itself from the very similar Essex skipper where they are black.

Small Skipper (Thymelicus sylvestris) © Frank Vassen cc

Essex Skipper

Thymelicus lineola

Family: Hesperiidae (skipper)

Habitat: Grassland.

Size: 14 mm. Wingspan 2.5 to 2.9 cm.

Food: Cock's-foot, creeping soft grass, couch grass, timothy-grass, meadow foxtail, false brome and tor-grass.

Flight: All year round.

IUCN Conservation Status: Not Evaluated

Almost identical to the small skipper but has black-tipped antennae. The caterpillar is green, with yellow incisions between its rings.

Essex Skipper (Thymelicus lineola) © Gail Hampshire cc

Large White

Pieris brassicae

Family: Pieridae (Yellows-and-Whites)

Habitat: Farmland, gardens and parks and meadows.

Size: 32 mm.

Food: Adults - brassicas, radishes. Larvae - buddleia or thistles.

Flight: Early April to late October. April to October.

Migration is atypical, they fly towards the poles in the spring, and towards the equator in the autumn. Migratory paths are over 800 kilometres but individual butterflies may not cover the entire path.

Caterpillars eat plants which make them distasteful to predators.

Large White (Pieris brassicae) © Gareth Williams cc

Comma

Polygonia c-album

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Woodland, gardens and parks and hedgerows.

Size: Length 24 mm. Wingspan 50-64 mm.

Food: Hops, stinging nettle and elm.

Flight: Early April to late September.

The comma is given its name by a white comma shaped mark on the underside of its hind wing.

Comma (Polygonia c-album) © photo by Dave Dunford

Red Admiral

Vanessa atalanta

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Gardens and parks, meadows, coastal and sea cliffs.

Size: Length 30 mm (1.2 in.) Wingspan ♀ 70-78 mm (2.8-3.1 In.). ♂ 64-72 mm (2.5-2.8 In.)

Food: Stinging nettle and ivy.

Flight: Early May to late October.

Both a resident and a migrant butterfly.

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Large Skipper

Ochlodes sylvanus

Family: Hesperiidae (skipper)

Habitat: Grassland, hedgerows, woodland clearings and edges.

Size: Length 16 mm.

Food: Cocksfoot mainly but also purple moor-grass, false brome, tor-grass and wood small-reed. Adult - bramble flowers.

Flight: Early May to late September.

The hook-shaped antenna tips distinguish it from other skippers.

On hatching the larvae constructs a shelter by curling a leaf up with silk and begins to feed.

Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) © M.Albi cc

Holly Blue

Celastrina argiolus

Family: Lycaenidae (Blue)

Habitat: Hedgerows, gardens, churchyards, woodland, parks.

Size: Length 16 mm.

Food: Mainly holly and ivy. Sometimes spindle, dogwood and heathers.

Flight: Early April to late September.

Winter is passed as a pupa. The caterpillars are usually green, but some have pink stripes.

Holly Blue (Celastrina argiolus) © Gail Hampshire cc

Peacock

Aglais io

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Gardens and parks, grasslands, meadows and woodland.

Size: Length 30 mm.

Food: Stinging nettles. Buddleia, willows, dandelions, wild marjoram, danewort, hemp agrimony, and clover.

Flight: Early June to late September. March after hibernation.

Fast flying butterfly. The eye spots on its wings scare predators.

Peacock (Aglais io) ♂ ♀ © cc

Small Tortoiseshell

Aglais urticae

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Gardens and parks, meadows, arable field margins and hedgerows.

Size: Length 25 mm (1 in). Wingspan ♂ 45-55 mm, ♀ 52-62 mm.

Food: Adult: Nectar. Caterpillar: Stinging nettle.

Flight: Early March to late October.

One of the earliest butterflies to appear in spring after winter hibernation.

Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae) ♂ © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

White-letter Hairstreak

Satyrium w-album

Family: Lycaenidae (Blue)

Habitat: Woodland and hedgerows.

Size: Length 16 mm (0.63 in). Wingspan 25-35 mm (1-1.4 in).

Food: Elm honeydew, creeping thistle and bramble blossom.

Flight: Early June to late August.

Winter is spent as an egg on an elm tree. The caterpillar hatches in march and feeds on the elm flowers and seeds.

Named after the W shaped white line on its underside.

White-letter Hairstreak (Satyrium w-album) © Frank Vassen cc

Common Blue

Polyommatus icarus

Family: Lycaenidae (Blue)

Habitat: Farmland, gardens and parks, grassland, heathland, meadows and orchards.

Size: Length 17 mm (0.7 in). Wingspan 29-36 mm (1.1-1.4 in).

Food: Common bird's-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and other legumes.

Flight: Early April to late October.

Females are dark brown with bright orange spots near the wing tips. Both male and female have black and white borders.

Common Blue ♂ (Polyommatus icarus) © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Ringlet

Aphantopus hyperantus

Family: Nymphalidae (Brush-footed)

Habitat: Meadows, hedgerows, mixed scrub and woodland clearings and edges.

Size: Length 19 mm (0.7 in)

Food: Various grasses.

Flight: Early June to late August.

Named after the rings on the hindwings, the ringlet is one of the few that flies on overcast days.

Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus) © Böhringer Friedrich cc

Small Red-eyed Damselfly

Erythromma viridulum

Family: Coenagrionidae (Blue, Blue-tailed & Red Damselflies)

Habitat: Ponds, lakes and reservoirs and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 29 mm (1.1 in.) Hw 16-20 mm (0.6-0.8 mm).

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early June to late September.

Small Red-eyed Damselfly (Erythromma viridulum) © Melissa McMasters cc

Azure Damselfly

Coenagrion puella

Family: Coenagrionidae (Blue, Blue-tailed & Red Damselflies)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 33 mm.

Food: Winged insects.

Flight: Early April to late September.

Azure Damselfly (Coenagrion puella) © Tony Court cc

Blue-tailed Damselfly

Ischnura elegans

Family: Coenagrionidae (Blue, Blue-tailed & Red Damselflies)

Habitat: Ponds, lakes and reservoirs and wetlands.

Size: Length 31 mm (1.2 in.) Wingspan 40 mm (1.6 in).

Food: Aerial and non-aerial insects.

Flight: Early April to late September.

The average survival time for adult is about 10 days.

Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans) ♂ © Gail Hampshire cc

Black-tailed Skimmer

Orthetrum cancellatum

Family: Libellulidae (Chasers, Skimmers and Darters)

Habitat: Ponds, lakes and reservoirs and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 47-53 mm. Wingspan 77 mm. Hindwings 35-41 mm.

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early May to late September.

Mature males patrol acquired waterside territory of up to 50 m.

Black-tailed Skimmer (Orthetrum cancellatum) ♀ © Frank Vassen cc

Common Darter

Sympetrum striolatum

Family: Libellulidae (Chasers, Skimmers and Darters)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 38-43 mm (1.5-1.7 in). Hindwing 25-30 mm (1- 1.2 in).

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early May to late December.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

Perches on low vegetation or the ground from which it pursues passing insects.

Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) ♂ © Geert Orye cc

Red-eyed Damselfly

Erythromma najas

Family: Coenagrionidae (Blue, Blue-tailed & Red Damselflies)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 35 mm (1.4 in). Hw: 19-24 mm (0.75-1.0 in)

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: All year round.

Red-eyed Damselfly (Erythromma najas) © Alastair Rae cc

Brown Hawker

Aeshna grandis

Family: Aeshnidae (Hawkers and Emperors)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs and ponds.

Size: Length 65-75 mm (.25-.30 in), wingspan 100 mm (3.9 in).

Food: Flying insects.

Flight: Early June to late October.

Patrols a waterside hunting territory, attacking any intruders.

Brown Hawker (Aeshna grandis) ♀ © Pavel Kirillov cc

Ruddy Darter

Sympetrum sanguineum

Family: Libellulidae (Chasers, Skimmers and Darters)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds, woodland and rivers and streams.

Size: Length: 34-36 mm (1.3-1.4 in). Wingspan 60 mm (2.4 in).

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early June to late November.

IUCN Conservation Status: Least Concern

The male is red with a red-brown thorax.

Ruddy Darter (Sympetrum sanguineum) ♀ © Ivo Ivov cc

Four-spotted Chaser

Libellula quadrimaculata

Family: Libellulidae (Chasers, Skimmers and Darters)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds, heathland, estuaries and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 39-48 mm (1.5-1.9 in). Hindwing 32-40 mm (1.3-1.6 In).

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early April to late October.

Perches near water and has an aggressive territorial flight. It also has a gliding flight.

Also will feed in swarms in the evening.

Four-spotted Chaser (Libellula quadrimaculata) © Tony Court cc

Emerald Damselfly

Lestes sponsa

Family: Lestidae (Emerald Damselflies)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 38 mm (1.5 in)

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early June to late September.

Perches on vegetation from which it pursues passing insects.

Emerald Damselfly (Lestes sponsa) © Gail Hampshire cc

Migrant Hawker

Aeshna mixta

Family: Aeshnidae (Hawkers and Emperors)

Habitat: Lakes and reservoirs, ponds, estuaries, hedgerows and rivers and streams.

Size: Length 63 mm (2.5 in). Hindwing 37-40 mm (1.5-1.6 in).

Food: Aerial insects.

Flight: Early July to late November.

Not aggressive and occasionally gathers in large feeding swarms.

Migrant Hawker (Aeshna mixta) © Ferran Pestaña cc

Common Bird's-foot-trefoil

Lotus corniculatus

Family: Fabaceae

Habitat: Grasslands.

Size: Length 5-50 cm.

Flowering Period: All year round.

Grown for pasture, hay, and silage.

An important nectar source for many insects and is also used as a larval food plant by many species of Lepidoptera such as six-spot burnet.

Common Bird's-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) © Peter O'Connor cc
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About

WWT London Wetland Centre covers more than 100 acres (40 hectares) of land which was formerly occupied by four small victorian reservoirs. It now provides habitats for over 200 species of birds. 

There is a World Wetlands Trail which is flat and takes about 45 minutes to walk around. On your way, you will see ducks, geese and swans from around the world such as red-breasted geese, barnacle geese and nene, and a family of Asian short-clawed otters. There are several bird hides to make observation easier.

There is also an undercover Pond Zone where you can use a remote controlled underwater camera and, under supervision, catch creatures such as a water scorpion or a frog.

Several sustainable gardens such as a rain garden, slate garden and wildlife garden provide habitats for amphibians, insects and mammals.

There are several places to sit and have a picnic, a children's play area, a café and a shop. 

If you join the WWT, a registered charity, you get unlimited entry into WWT's nine wetland centres around the country and of course help them in their conservation work.

WWT London Wetland Centre is a designated area - Site of Special Scientific Interest.


Facilities at WWT London Wetland Centre

Café

Toilet

Charity link
http://www.wwt.org.uk/support/

Places to visit nearby
Chiswick House and Gardens   1.08 miles (1.74 km)
Chiswick House and Gardens, Burlington Lane, London, Greater London, W4 2RQ, England, UK.
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Chiswick House and Gardens is cared for and maintained by English Heritage.

Chiswick House and Gardens © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Gunnersbury Triangle Nature Reserve   1.94 miles (3.11 km)
Gunnersbury Triangle Nature Reserve, Chiswick High Road, London, Greater London, W4 5RH, England, UK.
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Gunnersbury Triangle Nature Reserve is a nature reserve cared for and maintained by London Wildlife Trust.

Many species can be observed over the course of the ...

Gunnersbury Triangle Nature Reserve © Gail Hampshire cc

Carlyle's House   2.92 miles (4.70 km)
Carlyle's House, 24 Cheyne Row, Chelsea, Greater London, SW3 5HL, England, UK.
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Carlyle's House was the home of the historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle. The building is a Georgian terraced house dating from 1708.

Carlyle's House © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Natural History Museum   2.99 miles (4.81 km)
Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd, South Kensington, Greater London, SW7 5BD, England, UK.
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The Natural History Museum is home to 70 million life and earth science specimens in five main collections: botany, entomology, mineralogy, palaeontology paleontology and ...

Natural History Museum © David Iliff cc

The Science Museum   3.09 miles (4.98 km)
Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London, Greater London, SW7 2DD, England, UK.
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The Science Museum, founded in 1857, is home to over 300,000 items such as the world's first jet engine, a reconstruction of Francis Crick and James Watson's model of DNA, ...

The Science Museum © Christine Matthews cc

Victoria and Albert Museum   3.13 miles (5.04 km)
Cromwell Road, South Kensington, London, Greater London, SW7 2RL, England, UK.
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The Victoria and Albert Museum is the largest museum of decorative arts and design in the world, housing a permanent collection of over 4.

Victoria and Albert Museum ©

Lindsey House   3.17 miles (5.10 km)
99-100 Cheyne Walk, Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London, Greater London, SW10 0DQ, England, UK.
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Lindsey House is a Grade II listed house. It is owned by the National Trust but is tenanted and only open to the public by special arrangement.

Lindsey House © MTM MVP VizitIt.com arr

Places to stay nearby
Premier Inn London Hammersmith   1.12 miles (1.80 km)
King St, Hammersmith W6 9LU
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Premier Inn London Hammersmith

Premier Inn London Hammersmith   1.21 miles (1.95 km)
London Hammersmith Premier Inn, King Street, London, Greater London, W6 9LU, England, UK.
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The Premier Inn London Hammersmith is part of the Premier Inn group.

Premier Inn London Hammersmith

Premier Inn London Putney Bridge   1.24 miles (2.00 km)
London Putney Bridge Premier Inn, Willow Bank, London, Greater London, SW6 3JL, England, UK.
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The Premier Inn London Putney Bridge is part of the Premier Inn group.

Premier Inn London Putney Bridge

Novotel London West   1.27 miles (2.05 km)
Shortlands W6 8DR
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Novotel London West

Ibis London Earls Court   1.66 miles (2.68 km)
Lillie Rd SW6 1UD
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Ibis London Earls Court

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